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December 03, 2013

Delta bumps passengers so that a basketball team can take their seats

The basketball team's chartered plane broke down, so Delta bumped a bunch of people off their flights and sent them to other airports--by bus--to fly home. Those bumped people missed important events--a FUNERAL--while the ballers got to their game a day early. Delta Bumps Passengers So University Of Florida Basketball Team Could Fly Instead | ThinkProgress
The University of Florida men’s basketball team ran into a small problem upon leaving Gainesville Sunday night: the charter jet the Gators were supposed to use to get to a road game against the University of Connecticut was grounded for maintenance. Luckily for the Gators, Delta Airlines was there to fix the problem for them. At the expense of other travelers. Delta, according to a report in the Gainesville Sun (via Gawker), told passengers on flight 5059 out of Gainesville that their flight was canceled thanks to maintenance issues on their plane. That’s when a few passengers saw the Florida basketball team boarding the plane instead. A Delta spokesperson told the Sun that “due to operational need and aircraft routing requirements as a result of the busy travel holiday,” the airline chose to cancel the commercial flight. The flight was originally scheduled to leave Gainesville at 3:30 p.m. Sunday. Florida’s game against UConn didn’t tip off until 7 p.m. Monday. So while the Gators landed in Connecticut about a day before their game, some of the original passengers weren’t so lucky. According to the Sun, one missed an appointment with a moving truck during a cross-country move. Another was a student who had to drive to Atlanta to make a required event. Yet another missed a funeral. Delta’s spokesperson said all the passengers were booked on new flights. Some of those flights, however, originated from other airports in Jacksonville (80 miles away), Orlando (130 miles), and Tampa (140 miles), and at least one of the passengers had to wait until Monday to catch a flight. The airline also provided the passengers with vouchers for future flights, though it did not disclose the values. Delta is required by federal transportation law to compensate passengers who are bumped from flights, up to $650 if arrival is delayed by one to two hours and up to $1,300 if arrival is delayed longer. The Department of Transportation fined Delta $750,000 in June for violating laws regarding the involuntary bumping of passengers.

When asked in 1982 about AIDS, Reagan's press secretary made jokes

These people were monsters. October 15, 1982 - White House Press Briefing
Q: Larry, does the President have any reaction to the announcement—the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, that AIDS is now an epidemic and have over 600 cases? MR. SPEAKES: What’s AIDS? Q: Over a third of them have died. It’s known as “gay plague.” (Laughter.) No, it is. I mean it’s a pretty serious thing that one in every three people that get this have died. And I wondered if the President is aware of it? MR. SPEAKES: I don’t have it. Do you? (Laughter.) Q: No, I don’t. MR. SPEAKES: You didn’t answer my question. Q: Well, I just wondered, does the President— MR. SPEAKES: How do you know? (Laughter.) Q: In other words, the White House looks on this as a great joke? MR. SPEAKES: No, I don’t know anything about it, Lester. Q: Does the President, does anybody in the White House know about this epidemic, Larry? MR. SPEAKES: I don’t think so. I don’t think there’s been any— Q: Nobody knows? MR. SPEAKES: There has been no personal experience here, Lester. Q: No, I mean, I thought you were keeping— MR. SPEAKES: I checked thoroughly with Dr. Ruge this morning and he’s had no—(laughter)—no patients suffering from AIDS or whatever it is. Q: The President doesn’t have gay plague, is that what you’re saying or what? MR. SPEAKES: No, I didn’t say that. Q: Didn’t say that? MR. SPEAKES: I thought I heard you on the State Department over there. Why didn’t you stay there? (Laughter.) Q: Because I love you, Larry, that’s why. (Laughter.) MR. SPEAKES: Oh, I see. Just don’t put it in those terms, Lester. (Laughter.) Q: Oh, I retract that. MR. SPEAKES: I hope so. Q: It’s too late.