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July 04, 2011

Exxon pipeline dumps 42,000 gallons of oil into Yellowstone River. For America.

In honor of July 4th, I'm ending every headline with "For America." (Which idea came from @KenLowery on Twitter.) Exxon cleanup under way in Yellowstone River | Business | Dallas Business, Texas Busines...
LAUREL, Mont. — An oil pipeline that spewed tens of thousands of gallons of crude oil into Montana's Yellowstone River was temporarily shut down in May because of concerns over rising waters, and regulators twice in the last year warned Exxon Mobil of several safety violations along the line. Exxon Mobil officials estimated that up to 1,000 barrels, or 42,000 gallons, spilled late Friday night before the flow from the damaged pipeline was stopped. The break near Laurel has fouled miles of riverbank and forced municipalities and irrigation districts to close intakes across eastern Montana. By early Monday the company had received 70 calls into a hotline set up for property owners suffering from the spill, although spokesman Alan Jeffers said not all of those were reports of oil. . . . The 12-inch pipeline, which delivered about 40,000 barrels of crude today to a refinery in Billings, was shut down in May because of concerns over rising waters following heavy rains in Eastern Montana , Exxon Mobil Pipeline Co. president Gary Pruessing said Sunday. The company decided to restart the line after examining its safety record and deciding the risk was low, he said. The cause of the spill has not yet been determined, but company and government officials have speculated that high waters in recent weeks may have scoured the river bottom and exposed the pipeline to debris that could have damaged the pipe. Eastern Montana received record rainfall in the last month and also has a huge snowpack in the mountains that is melting, which has resulted in widespread flooding. "We are very curious about what may have happened at the bottom of the river. We don't have that yet," Pruessing said . . . EPA spokeswoman Sonya Pennock said its staff had spotted oil at least 40 miles downstream. There were other reports of oil as far as 100 miles away, near the town of Hysham. The uncertainty frustrated riverfront property owners such as Linda Corbin, who worried that severe damage would be revealed as the flooding Yellowstone recedes in coming weeks. The stench of spilled crude was obvious in Corbin's backyard - a reminder of the potential problems lurking beneath the surface of the nearby river. "The smell has been enough to gag a maggot," said Corbin, 64. "I just hope it doesn't come too far because I'm on a well, and I won't appreciate having to shower in Exxon oil."

June 29, 2011

Fractionation, how America continues to magnificently screw over Native Americans

This is seriously messed up. This Land Is Our Land -- In These Times
Reynolds visited the reservation’s BIA office and asked if officials would show him what he owned. One man told him: “I’ll take you out there. And that baseball cap you’re wearing—you can just throw it in the air and wherever it lands, that can be the land you own.” Reynolds quickly discovered that, thanks to a Byzantine federal system of managing tribal land, he had inherited only a fraction of his grandparents’ property title. That discovery was the result of “fractionation,” a practice dating back to the 1887 passage of the General Allotment Act, also known as the Dawes Act, which intended to “civilize” Indians by assimilating them into a sedentary, agrarian lifestyle. The legislation divided 138 million acres of communally owned tribal land across the nation into 160-, 80- or 40-acre parcels. The government distributed those parcels to individual tribe members, but at the same time still held the land in trust, believing Indians incapable of managing their own affairs. It was, and to this day remains, a system rooted in the government’s racist assumption that it can manage Indian reservations better than Indians. Indians cannot sell or lease their trust land without federal approval, and the government is supposed to distribute any revenues earned from the land (through leasing to farmers, railroads, mining companies and other private interests) to the individual landowners. As soon as the first allottees died, the government began dividing property among their descendents. But heirs did not inherit pieces of land with specific boundaries. Instead, they inherited fractions of the title—a title held in trust by the federal government. This system leaves most allotment heirs with tiny, in effect unusable, fractions of ownership. . . .

June 23, 2011

Bankrupt by Beanie Babies

The film is made by the son of the gentleman with the heart tshirt. I worked for a few months in college at a Spencer Gifts-type store. We sold the fuck out of Beanie Babies. When the shipment of Beanies would arrive, the parents and collectors would riot and tear through the boxes, elbowing each other and so on. Madness. Bankrupt By Beanies

Southwest Airlines pilot accientally broadcasts hateful diatribe to every plane in Texas

He complains that the flight attendants are not people he finds attractive and wishes he had coworkers he could ave sex with. He communicates this by bitching about the "Gays, Grannies, and Grandes." Stay classy, Southwest pilots. Whoopsie Daisy of the Day - The Daily What