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Massive class action suit filed against McDonald's for systemic wage theft

Shit just got real at America's worst restaurant.

McDonald’s workers sue for wage theft: The battle is going to be fascinating


Today, McDonald’s workers in New York, California, and Michigan filed class action suits against the chain, as well as several franchises, for alleged wage theft violations. The cases accuse the fast-food giant of “systematically stealing employees’ wages by forcing them to work off the clock, shaving hours off their time cards, and not paying them overtime, among other practices,” according to a press release by the workers’ lawyers.

First, the money. The workers are represented by Cohen Milstein Sellers & Toll, which is one of the few major American law firms that specializes in representing plaintiffs in class actions. It tends not to bring suits without a somewhat reasonable case or the chance of a significant payday.

Second, publicity. The suit comes in the midst of a long public relations campaign by fast-food workers demanding higher wages. Employees at McDonald’s and other chains have been walking off the job in daylong strikes that, while mostly symbolic, have added fuel to the drive for a higher minimum wage.

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We know that McDonalds and other fast-food franchisors regularly tell the franchisees what prices they can charge (mandating the Dollar Menu, for instance), and that the franchisees are also required to buy supplies from corporate at a fixed price. More...

-JDG1980

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And finally, information. Lawsuits can reveal an enormous amount about the workings of a company that management wouldn’t ordinarily have to disclose publicly. The only reason we have a somewhat detailed sense of how Walmart pays its workers, for instance, is that the company was forced to hand over internal data as part of a gender discrimination case. Salon’s Josh Eidelson hits on a key point about the new class actions: They could give the workers’ attorneys the chance to dig through corporate records and find out more about the exact relationship between McDonald’s and the independent franchises that employ most of the chain's workers.

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